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Stumbling over Truth: The inside story of the sexed-up Dossier, Hutton and the BBC

The Hutton Inquiry set up to investigate the circumstances surrounding Dr Kelly's death lead to one of the biggest shake ups the BBC has seen. Not only did it cost the corporation its chairman and director general, but many believe it brought in a new age of caution. Kevin Marsh author of the new novel 'Stumbling over Truth', questions whether the media still has the ability - or the appetite - to hold power to account?


It has been ten years since the publication of the "September Dossier", part of an ongoing investigation by the government into weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. The following year, on 29 May, the then BBC defence correspondent Andrew Gilligan reported on Radio 4's Today programme that he had been told by an unnamed source that the dossier had been "sexed up". His source was later revealed to be government scientist Dr David Kelly who was subsequently found dead in a field in Oxfordshire.
The Hutton Inquiry set up to investigate the circumstances surrounding Dr Kelly's death lead to one of the biggest shake ups the BBC has seen. Not only did it cost the corporation its chairman and director general, but many believe it brought in a new age of caution.
Kevin Marsh who was editor of the Today programme at the time was not given an opportunity to give evidence at the Inquiry. Now, after leaving the BBC, he reveals for the first time in his new book how the BBC reacted in the face of unprecedented government pressure.
Kevin Marsh and others will be joining us to ask to what extent have the events of ten years ago affected the BBC and its willingness to tackle stories that challenge the government line. Does the British media still have the ability - or appetite - to hold power to account?
With:
Kevin Marsh, one of the BBC's longest-serving frontline programme editors. He has edited Radio 4's PM, The World at One, The World This Weekend and Today. He also developed and launched Broadcasting House. In 2006 he became the BBC College of Journalism's first executive editor and left the BBC in 2011 to set up his own media teaching and coaching company OffspinMedia.
Additional panelists to be confirmed.


Speaker(s):

Mr Kevin Marsh | talks

 

Date and Time:

18 September 2012 at 7:00 pm

Duration:

1 hour 30 minutes

 

Venue:

Frontline Club
13 Norfolk Place
London
W2 1QJ
+44 (0)20 7479 8950
http://www.frontlineclub.com

More at Frontline Club...

 

Tickets:

£12.50 Standard, £10 Concession

Available from:

http://www.frontlineclub.com/events/2012/09/

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