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ART AND REVOLUTION/ART AND POLITICS : CHINA’S REVOLUTION

Contemporary artists all over the world are currently engaging with politics. But there are precedents where artists reflected and defined the cultural language for some of history’s great turning points. This course looks at the art, music, and literature that evolved from several major revolutions and the responses to them.


1912 saw the overthrow of China’s last imperial dynasty and the establishment of the Chinese Republic. Communist rebellions in the 1920s, the Japanese
occupation of eastern China (1937-45), and the communist Revolution followed culminating in the People’s Republic of China, established in 1949. Mao’s Cultural Revolution (1966-76) incited artists to make art for the people. Socialist realist oil paintings supplanted traditional ink painting and artists who refused to adapt were persecuted. This session will explore these shifts in content and medium and the impact of politics on artists such as figure painter and landscapist Fu Baoshi; history painters Tang Xiaohe and Chen Yanning; portraiture by Liu Chunhua; and the fate of ink painters like Shi Lu.


Speaker(s):

Dr Marie-Anne Mancio | talks | www

 

Date and Time:

3 June 2014 at 10:45 am

Duration:

Half Day

 

Venue:

The University Women's Club
2 Audley Square
London
W1K 1DB


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Organised by:

THE COURSE
See other talks organised by THE COURSE...

 

Tickets:

£44

Available from:

info@thecoursestudies.co.uk

Additional Information:

visit www.thecoursestudies.co.uk

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