Text full multimedia monochrome

First time here?

Find out more about how The Lecture List works.

Do you organise talks?

Register to tell us about them. The Lecture List is a great place to be listed, but it's also an easy place to upload your information to. It's very simple and costs nothing. Find out more

Help!

Find out what you can do to keep The Lecture List online

Border crossings: in the light of history

Nationalism has been one of the most dynamic yet dangerous ideologies in modern history. Politicians encourage us to think that national frontiers are firm and unchanging, central to our identity. But in this session, members of the History Faculty reflect on the porous nature of borders. With Professors David Reynolds, Chris Clark and Dr Joya Chatterjee.


Nationalism has been one of the most dynamic yet dangerous ideologies in modern history. Politicians encourage us to think that national frontiers are firm and unchanging, central to our identity. But in this session, members of the History Faculty reflect on the porous nature of borders. With Professors David Reynolds, Chris Clark and Dr Joya Chatterjee.

THE BALKANS AND THE LEGACIES OF 1914
Prof. Chris Clark (St Catharine's)
Professor of Modern European History
Until recently, a bronze plaque in Sarajevo commemorated the moment in June 1914 when the young Bosnian Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip assassinated an Austrian Archduke and took ‘the first steps into Yugoslav liberty’. National tensions wrought havoc on the Balkan peninsula in 1912 and 1913 and triggered the outbreak of the First World War. After the collapse of Soviet power, they helped to bring about the dissolution of the Yugoslavian state. Chris Clark unravels the legacies of a region in which political borders and cultural identities have never coincided.

MAKING AND BREAKING MODERN SOUTH ASIA
Dr Joya Chatterji (Trinity)
Reader in Modern South Asian History
The British Raj came to an abrupt end in 1947 but millions of people in South Asia are still living with the legacies of its break-up. Joya Chatterji unravels the tangled story and the nationalist mythologies spun around it. A schools project she has developed in London with migrants from Bangladesh shows how a clearer understanding of the past can promote reconciliation in the present.

BRITAIN, EUROPE AND THE LEGACIES OF 1940
Prof. David Reynolds (Christ's)
Professor of International History
The events of 1940 cast a long shadow over modern Europe. They drove Britain away from the continent, just at a time when it had been drawing closer to France. Across the Channel, however, the appalling legacies of 1940 for France and Germany persuaded these two countries to transcend their long cycle of border wars and forge an unprecedented European Community. David Reynolds reflects on the frontiers of the mind that often matter as much in history as visible national borders.


Speaker(s):

Professor David Reynolds | talks
Professor Chris Clark | talks | www
Dr Joya Chatterjee | talks

 

Date and Time:

2 November 2013 at 5:00 pm

Duration:

1 hour

 

Venue:

Lady Mitchell Hall
Sidgwick Site
Sidgwick Avenue
Cambridge
CB3 9DA

http://www.cambridgescience.org
Show map

Organised by:

External Affairs and Communications, University of Cambridge
See other talks organised by External Affairs and Communications, University of Cambridge...

 

Tickets:

free

Available from:

The event is free but booking in advance is required.
Booking information:
www.cam.ac.uk/festival-of-ideas
or: 01223 766766
Bookings open on 23 September at 10 am.

Additional Information:

This event is part of the Cambridge Festival of Ideas which runs from 23 October – 3 November 2013.

Register to tell a friend about this lecture.

Comments

If you would like to comment about this lecture, please register here.



 

Any ad revenue is entirely reinvested into the Lecture List's operating fund