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‘That Wondrous Child’: a talk by Janet Snowman

How did British artists depict famous child musicians and actors in a period in which such a culture of celebrity flourished, and childhood itself was celebrated?


Kissed by Emma Hamilton, feted by the great and the good and portrayed in paint, print, pottery, caricature and commemorative art such as medals by some of the most popular artists of the day, the young actor William Henry West Betty, born in 1791, caused both chaos and a sensation when he made his first appearances in London at Covent Garden in 1804. The great actors of the day are said to have thought that their own careers were in peril owing to the child’s popularity.

How did British artists depict famous child musicians and actors in a period in which such a culture of celebrity flourished, and childhood itself was celebrated?

This evening’s talk will consider the work of artists from c.1770s-1810, such as John Russell, Sir William Beechey, George Romney, John Opie and many others, in their depictions of the British infant performer.

Master Betty, known also as the Infant Roscius, is buried on the East Side of Highgate Cemetery.

Janet Snowman is Curator of art and Iconography at The Royal academy of Music Museum


Speaker(s):

Janet Snowman | talks

 

Date and Time:

23 April 2015 at 7:30 pm

Duration:

1 hour

 

Venue:

Highgate Cemetery
Swains Lane
Highgate
London
N6 6PJ
0208 340 1834
http://www.highgatecemetery.org

More at Highgate Cemetery...

 

Tickets:

£7

Available from:

www.highgatecemetery.org

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