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Now you hear it, now you donít: the neuroscience of deafness

How are the outer hair cells maintained and, importantly, what do we still need to know to preserve them for a lifetime?


What makes hearing possible? Just the size of a pea, the cochlea of the inner ear allows you to detect anything from a pin drop to a car horn. Groups of cells within the cochlea, and in particular the outer hair cells act as biological microphones to amplify soundwaves and allow your brain to understand a whole world of sound.

For an ageing population it is critical that the outer hair cells last as long as possible for without them we become progressively deaf.

How are the cells maintained and, importantly, what do we still need to know to preserve them for a lifetime? Professor Ashmore will explore how these incredible biological hearing aids work and you can join the hunt for the molecules that power them.


Speaker(s):

Professor Jonathan Ashmore | talks | www

 

Date and Time:

15 May 2017 at 6:30 pm

Duration:

1 hour

 

Venue:

The Royal Society
6-9 Carlton House Terrace
London
SW1Y 5AG
+44 20 74 51 2500
http://www.royalsociety.org

More at The Royal Society...

 

Tickets:

Free

Available from:

events@royalsociety.org

Additional Information:

Free to attend
No registration required
Doors open from 18:00 and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

Enquiries: events@royalsociety.org

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