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Computational frontiers in scientific discovery

This meeting will explore the similarities and differences between the computational approaches across different disciplines


Over the last four years the Royal Society and the Académie des sciences, with support from Microsoft Research, have awarded an annual prize to honour those scientists whose developments of novel computational methods have had a major impact in their area of scientific discovery. This meeting brings together these award winners, with leading scientists at the forefront of their disciplines, ranging from astrophysics and climate prediction, to genome biology and human variation. This meeting will explore the similarities and differences between the computational approaches across different disciplines and highlight potential synergies, whereby one discipline can borrow from another to speed up the process of discovery.


Speaker(s):

Professor Nicholas Ayache | talks
Dr Ewan Birney | talks
Dr Peer Bork | talks
Dr Dennis Bray | talks
Professor Stephen Emmott | talks
Professor Giorgio Parisi | talks
Professor Neil Ferguson | talks
Professor Julia Slingo | talks
Professor Matthias Steinmetz | talks

 

Date and Time:

4 November 2010 at 9:30 am

Duration:

Full Day

 

Venue:

The Royal Society
6-9 Carlton House Terrace
London
SW1Y 5AG
+44 20 74 51 2500
http://www.royalsociety.org

More at The Royal Society...

 

Tickets:

Free

Available from:

This seminar is free to attend, but pre-registration online is essential

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