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A Talk on Gothic Literature and History

A Talk on Gothic Literature and History
Speaker Professor Clive Bloom

Upstairs at the Wheatsheaf
Rathbone Place W1
7:30 pm
23rd November

Tis the witching time of year and time to turn our thoughts to graveyards and ghouls. The taste for all things Gothic is nearly two hundred and fifty years old. It embraces architecture, literature, theatre, fashion, painting, folk tales, film, photography and even tourism. The gothic became the style for baronial halls, nouveau-riche mansions and even the Houses of Parliament, but it also turned landscape and architecture into one gigantic imaginative playground where the mountains and forests of Italy, Germany and Spain or the architecture of ruins and castle walls, could be used by authors to hide ghosts and demons, enjoy sexual excess or indulge in religious hysteria. In shadowy corridors, locked dungeons and charnel vaults, the vampire walks, the skeletal nun creeps and the mad scientist maniacally laughs. As the gothic has grown it has reflected a growing set of lifestyle choices and locations from New York or New Orleans to the drug-addled streets of Soho and Fitzrovia.

Professor Bloom is the author of Gothic Histories: The Taste for Terror, 1764 to the Present and Gothic Horror: A Guide for Students and Readers

Event Date : 23/11/2010

A Talk on Gothic Literature and History
Speaker Professor Clive Bloom

Upstairs at the Wheatsheaf
Rathbone Place W1
7:30 pm
23rd November

Tis the witching time of year and time to turn our thoughts to graveyards and ghouls. The taste for all things Gothic is nearly two hundred and fifty years old. It embraces architecture, literature, theatre, fashion, painting, folk tales, film, photography and even tourism. The gothic became the style for baronial halls, nouveau-riche mansions and even the Houses of Parliament, but it also turned landscape and architecture into one gigantic imaginative playground where the mountains and forests of Italy, Germany and Spain or the architecture of ruins and castle walls, could be used by authors to hide ghosts and demons, enjoy sexual excess or indulge in religious hysteria. In shadowy corridors, locked dungeons and charnel vaults, the vampire walks, the skeletal nun creeps and the mad scientist maniacally laughs. As the gothic has grown it has reflected a growing set of lifestyle choices and locations from New York or New Orleans to the drug-addled streets of Soho and Fitzrovia.

Professor Bloom is the author of Gothic Histories: The Taste for Terror, 1764 to the Present and Gothic Horror: A Guide for Students and Readers

Event Date : 23/11/2010

A Talk on Gothic Literature and History
Speaker Professor Clive Bloom

Upstairs at the Wheatsheaf
Rathbone Place W1
7:30 pm
23rd November

Tis the witching time of year and time to turn our thoughts to graveyards and ghouls. The taste for all things Gothic is nearly two hundred and fifty years old. It embraces architecture, literature, theatre, fashion, painting, folk tales, film, photography and even tourism. The gothic became the style for baronial halls, nouveau-riche mansions and even the Houses of Parliament, but it also turned landscape and architecture into one gigantic imaginative playground where the mountains and forests of Italy, Germany and Spain or the architecture of ruins and castle walls, could be used by authors to hide ghosts and demons, enjoy sexual excess or indulge in religious hysteria. In shadowy corridors, locked dungeons and charnel vaults, the vampire walks, the skeletal nun creeps and the mad scientist maniacally laughs. As the gothic has grown it has reflected a growing set of lifestyle choices and locations from New York or New Orleans to the drug-addled streets of Soho and Fitzrovia.

Professor Bloom is the author of Gothic Histories: The Taste for Terror, 1764 to the Present and Gothic Horror: A Guide for Students and Readers

Event Date : 23/11/2010

Tis the witching time of year and time to turn our thoughts to graveyards and ghouls


A Talk on Gothic Literature and History
Speaker Professor Clive Bloom

Upstairs at the Wheatsheaf
Rathbone Place W1
7:30 pm
23rd November

A Talk on Gothic Literature and History
Speaker Professor Clive Bloom

Upstairs at the Wheatsheaf
Rathbone Place W1
7:30 pm
23rd November

Tis the witching time of year and time to turn our thoughts to graveyards and ghouls. The taste for all things Gothic is nearly two hundred and fifty years old. It embraces architecture, literature, theatre, fashion, painting, folk tales, film, photography and even tourism. The gothic became the style for baronial halls, nouveau-riche mansions and even the Houses of Parliament, but it also turned landscape and architecture into one gigantic imaginative playground where the mountains and forests of Italy, Germany and Spain or the architecture of ruins and castle walls, could be used by authors to hide ghosts and demons, enjoy sexual excess or indulge in religious hysteria. In shadowy corridors, locked dungeons and charnel vaults, the vampire walks, the skeletal nun creeps and the mad scientist maniacally laughs. As the gothic has grown it has reflected a growing set of lifestyle choices and locations from New York or New Orleans to the drug-addled streets of Soho and Fitzrovia.

Professor Bloom is the author of Gothic Histories: The Taste for Terror, 1764 to the Present and Gothic Horror: A Guide for Students and Readers

Event Date : 23/11/2010

The taste for all things Gothic is nearly two hundred and fifty years old. It embraces architecture, literature, theatre, fashion, painting, folk tales, film, photography and even tourism. The gothic became the style for baronial halls, nouveau-riche mansions and even the Houses of Parliament, but it also turned landscape and architecture into one gigantic imaginative playground where the mountains and forests of Italy, Germany and Spain or the architecture of ruins and castle walls, could be used by authors to hide ghosts and demons, enjoy sexual excess or indulge in religious hysteria. In shadowy corridors, locked dungeons and charnel vaults, the vampire walks, the skeletal nun creeps and the mad scientist maniacally laughs. As the gothic has grown it has reflected a growing set of lifestyle choices and locations from New York or New Orleans to the drug-addled streets of Soho and Fitzrovia.

Professor Bloom is the author of Gothic Histories: The Taste for Terror, 1764 to the Present and Gothic Horror: A Guide for Students and Readers

Event Date : 23/11/2010


Speaker(s):

Professor Clive Bloom | talks

 

Date and Time:

23 November 2010 at 7:30 am

Duration:

1 hour

 

Venue:

The Wheatsheaf
25 Rathbone Place
London
W1T 1DG
020 8960 7172

Show map

Organised by:

Sohemian Society
See other talks organised by Sohemian Society...

 

Tickets:

£3

Available from:

From door on evening.

Additional Information:

Website:www.sohemians.com

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